5 Unique Device Identification Challenges

Unique Device Identification ChallengesMany of FDA’s Unique Device Identification requirements have already phased in. The labels and packages of Class III and Class II medical devices, for instance, must now bear a UDI.

“But UDI is not over,” says Ardi Batmanghelidj, President and CEO of Innovatum, a software and regulatory consulting company specializing in life science labeling and Unique Device Identification (UDI) compliance. “In contrast, it is just beginning.

“Although many medical device manufacturers have complied, on-going maintenance for previously submitted UDI data will soon be enforced,” he tells PMP News. “And the regulatory requirements of UDI variants by regulatory bodies around the world will continue to make global UDI compliance a challenge for quite some time.”

Batmanghelidj explains 5 common UDI challenges and potential solutions.

Communication. One of the challenges arises from miscommunication of labeling data. “Most medical device manufacturers inexplicably approach UDI by separating it into two different projects that are managed by two different departments,” Batmanghelidj says. “The labeling team is responsible for UDI data on the label, and the UDI team is responsible for UDI data management and submissions. Yet, most of the data overlaps and must be kept in sync! Think of a row in an Excel spreadsheet that contains fields with labeling specific data for an item. Now think of adding additional columns to house regulatory data within that same row. Since some of the data within that row is placed upon sticky labels and some of that very same data is also being submitted to regulatory bodies, this data can be stored once and reused. This ensures data quality. The problem of having to prevent a likely mismatch between the information that is submitted and the information used on the label is now gone. With an extension to what is traditionally considered to be enterprise labeling software, it is now possible to bring these capabilities to life.”

Read the full article from Packaging Digest.


Real Benefits of UDI in the Operating Room and Beyond

benefits of udiLet’s face it, there are still those amongst us who grumble at the mention of having to comply with the UDI regulations. To them, it’s simply a matter of having to comply to stay in business. There are those of us however, who are advocates of the regulation and appreciate the benefits of UDI. We believe in its overall benefit for patient health and safety, and also as a means of facilitating business and reducing cost and errors.

The AIM North America Healthcare Committee recently presented a webinar to investigate the functionality of a system which makes extensive use of the UDI as a means of identifying medical devices in the operating room and associating those devices with patients’ medical health records. Through the use of in-line scanning technology during production, each device is entered into the chain of custody process where it is controlled throughout the supply chain from production to patient implantation. Part of this control includes anti-counterfeiting through confirmation of the pedigree at multiple checkpoints. Combatting counterfeit product is one of the benefits of UDI as counterfeit medical devices have wreaked havoc in the lives of patients, caregivers and others in the medical device community. Although the challenge in UDI is that multiple agencies and multiple barcodes can be used, there are differentiators that can allow a scanning device to be pointed at any barcode and in turn determine the agency and barcode type.

NOTE: The presentation below does contain some product marketing from the company which created the software however, it is a good demonstration of what a central device database can provide to the entire medical device industry. Capabilities include the ability to:

  • Identify which items are used and generate an invoice, thereby eliminating manual data entry
  • Compare costs, revisions, waste, and recalls, by manufacturer device, hospital and/or surgeon through real-time analytics
  • Identify and measure outcomes by physician, hospital and/or implants
  • Cross-reference devices, allowing stakeholders to alert patients when a recall occurs.
  • Deliver access to member information by recalled device
  • Provide member access to master implant database
  • Identify prior implantations by member/surgeon/payer
  • Eliminate overbilling by ensuring accurate device utilization by case
  • Identify actual device implants as opposed to paying for wasted or defective implants
  • Know exactly where each implant has been placed, targeting devices that need to be replaced because of a recall
  • Identify the responsible party when a revision or replacement is required

With AIM focused on AIDC matters, about 30 minutes into the presentation, focus shifts to the AIDC implications and the use of bar codes and issuing agencies and complexities that go along with it. You can view the presentation at this location: https://youtu.be/VaPZPVYI_cg. This is not an endorsement of the company or product, just a means of whetting the appetite for all of the possibilities that UDI provides.


Comparing GUDID Submission Options

GUDID Submission OptionsPulling information out of the FDA GUDID is simple. The public can access information contained in the GUDID through AccessGUDID. The FDA, in partnership with the National Library of Medicine (NLM) has announced that through AccessGUDID, anyone can search or download information that device labelers have submitted to the GUDID about their medical devices. GUDID submission options, however, is an area in which a few options present themselves.

GUDID Submission Options

#1 – GUDID Web Interface

A free secure online portal known as the GUDID Web Interface is provided by the FDA and it enables medical device labelers to enter UDI data directly into the GUDID database. Device labelers may submit, search and retrieve information about their devices via the GUDID Web Interface, which enables structured input of information one DI record at a time. A few caveats though, if data is entered using the GUDID Web Interface, it must be managed using the GUDID Web Interface. This portal is most practical for companies with <100 different SKUs or catalogue items. A number higher than that requires a more robust approach.

#2 – Software as a Service (SaaS)

The vast majority of GUDID submission offerings that are available in the market today, fall into this category. These cloud based offerings create data silos between your enterprise based systems and a third party. They also create a need for setting up and maintaining multiple connections between your enterprise systems and your product labeling systems. Introduction of errors caused by data getting out of sync between labeling and upload systems is a very real possibility. Proving auditable history for 21 CFR Part 11 compliance and potential trace history is more complex when some of the history resides in the cloud and some of it resides in other systems. In many cases, cloud based technologies have the capacity to reduce complexity. However, when it comes to regulated data upload and management, SaaS greatly compounds complexity. The outsourced service model offered by some SaaS providers is merely a way to pay a third party for some of the increased complexity that their business model creates.

#3 – Licensing A System

Systems are available from a few providers and Innovatum provides the most complete, end to end UDI solution in the industry. Although the complete suite of Innovatum’s ROBAR product line includes the option of labeling design and print management capabilities we are limiting this article to a focus on regulatory data upload. Suffice it to say that with this solution, the same database and corresponding connections to existing production and business systems (PLM, MDM, ERP, RA, etc.) can be used for both labeling data and the upload and management of regulatory data. This also means that one approval management system can be used for both labeling data approval and regulatory upload data approval. This remarkably reduces approval management overhead for medical device manufacturers and relabelers such as 3PLs and contract manufacturers. The ROBAR master data management and communication components are intended to be licensed as an on-premise solution for companies that desire tight control of their data. However, the solution can also be deployed in the cloud very easily. ROBAR MDM is a focused master data management database that is specifically designed for regulatory data. It serves as a real-time conduit for regulatory data that coalesces information from various sources and maintains the history of that data in a 21 CFR Part 11 compliant manner. The one-time licensing fee and annual maintenance costs for this technology winds up being much more cost effective than SaaS or service based per transaction, per item, per company revenue models.